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Saffron

Aromatic strands of Crocus sativus, better known as saffron, have been cultivated for millennia in Persia. This precious spice holds a strategic position in Iran’s agricultural landscape, contributing to over 90% of the world’s saffron production each year.

Saffron, often referred to as the “Red Flower,” is a versatile natural coloring and aromatic agent widely used in various culinary delights, pastries, beverages, pharmaceuticals, and more.

Medical research has further unveiled the refreshing benefits of saffron, both mentally and physically. Medical studies have demonstrated that consuming 3 grams of saffron every month can provide mental and physical rejuvenation.”

Aromatic strands of Crocus sativus, better known as saffron, have been cultivated for millennia in Persia. This precious spice holds a strategic position in Iran’s agricultural landscape, contributing to over 90% of the world’s saffron production each year.

Saffron, often referred to as the “Red Flower,” is a versatile natural coloring and aromatic agent widely used in various culinary delights, pastries, beverages, pharmaceuticals, and more.

Medical research has further unveiled the refreshing benefits of saffron, both mentally and physically. Medical studies have demonstrated that consuming 3 grams of saffron every month can provide mental and physical rejuvenation.”

The Art of Saffron Production

Saffron production is a labor-intensive process that unfolds every autumn. Dedicated saffron growers meticulously pluck the stigmas from the delicate flowers of the Saffron Crocus. Each plant yields only three precious stigmas, and it’s a staggering endeavor, with approximately 15,000 to 16,000 flowers needed to craft a single kilogram of this exquisite and costly spice. The production journey demands the commitment of at least 370 to 470 man-hours of diligent work.

 

Varieties of Saffron

saffron varities

Saffron comes in three primary types, distinguished by their structure and coloring strength:

S (Sargol): Also belonging to Category 1 in ISO 3632, Sargol saffron comprises the upper tips of the stigma. It is synonymous with top quality, offering a coloring strength of 230-250 and a vibrant all-red appearance.

N (Negin): Classified as Category 1 in ISO 3632, Negin saffron features long, unbroken stigmas, ironed flat to perfection. It represents prime quality with a coloring strength ranging between 260-280, displaying an alluring all-red hue.

Pushal: Classified as Category 2 in ISO 3632, Pushal saffron combines red stigmas with some yellow style, resulting in a coloring strength of 210-230.

Negin saffron holds the distinction of being the most expensive type, attributed to the extensive preparation work it demands. Its physical structure and unparalleled color quality set it apart.

Versatile Uses of Saffron

Saffron finds its way into a diverse array of culinary and cosmetic applications, including:

  • Enhancing the flavor and color of rice dishes
  • Adding a delightful touch to saffron ice cream
  • Elevating the aroma and appearance of baked goods
  • Crafting aromatic saffron tea
  • Creating flavorful saffron-infused chicken dishes
  • Incorporating into unique recipes like borage with saffron
  • Preparing saffron powder for various culinary purposes
  • Formulating saffron pills for potential health benefits
  • Harnessing the skin-enhancing properties of saffron and milk
  • Extracting precious saffron oil for culinary and cosmetic use
  • Preparing saffron-infused sauces to elevate dishes
  • Extracting saffron for various applications, including cosmetics and fragrances.

 

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